Posts tagged 'smartphone'

World’s First Firefox OS Smartphone Released In Spain

Though having Google’s Android and Apple’s IOS hitting the market with their name, quality, value and functionality, Telefonica has launched a new Firefox OS Smartphone in the market jointly with Mozilla and ZTE. Telephonica is Spain based telecommunication and broadband service provider in Europe, Latin America and Asia and 5th largest mobile network provider in the world; Mozilla, a open source project by Netscape Communications Corporation, launched the Mozilla Firefox browser and now developed Firefox OS for the Smartphone; ZTE Corporation, China based multinational telecommunication equipment and systems company, the 4th largest mobile manufacturer in the world, has developed this Smartphone’s design.

The above trio has launched world’s first Smartphone, ZTE Open, with Firefox Operating System in Spain for 69Euros(90Dollars) and soon be launched in Latin America.  As per the statement by Carlos Domingo, Chief Product Development, Telephonica, in one conference, this device would be mainly  be for youngsters and those who are new to use the Smartphones.

Equipped with a 3.5-inch & 480x320pixels touchscreen, includes a 3.2MP camera(back), 256MB RAM and 512MB flash memory enhanced with a 4GB MicroSD card that comes as part of the package.

The ZTE Open is fully integrated with Facebook and the Spain-based social network Tuenti and talks are on about incorporating the WhatsApp instant messaging service, Telefonica said.

Mozilla executives said the ZTE Open is the “first chapter” in what they expect to be a long project, one that is already attracting interest from many other telecommunications companies.

 

Excerpts – Techgig

July 3rd, 2013

Facebook not quite “Home” yet on mobile phones

Apparently, Facebook “Home” is not to be, not yet at least.

The Android application launched by Facebook to create an FB overlay on the Home screen of the phone was supposed to be the big bet by FB to control the first touchpoint screen for a smartphone user. But due to poor reviews by initial analysts, Facebook is said to be revamping the FB Home application. The device which was supposed to launch this was HTC One and in US, AT&T was to be the exclusive carrier for this. In UK, operator EE and Orange were planning to launch it. The social network is said to be encouraging the carriers to delay the launch to give the firm more time to create a more palatable user experience.

The battle for the phone user is becoming more intense as time goes by. With smartphones overtaking web users globally, it is of paramount importance for tech firms to own the phone customer and drive more and more smartphone traffic to these firms’ offerings, in order to attract ad revenue and other commerce monetizations.

Without a doubt, Facebook social network application remains one of the top apps on all mobile systems including Apple iOS and Android. But Google, Facebook, wireless carriers and other media are jostling for more and more of user attention on phones as well as real estate on the limited phone screen, which are the next evolution of internet cycle.

Facebook released the following statement on Thursday evening via Engadget: “Following customer feedback, Facebook has decided to focus on adding new customization features to Facebook Home over the coming months. While they are working to make a better Facebook Home experience, they have recommended holding off launching the HTC First in the UK, and so we will shortly be contacting those who registered their interest with us to let them know of this decision. Rest assured, we remain committed to bringing our customers the latest mobile experiences, and we will continue to build on our strong relationship with Facebook so as to offer customers new opportunities in the future.”

htc-first-2

HTC First aka “Facebook Phone”  (Photo: Courtesy / HTC)

After extremely disappointing sales of the HTC First, Facebook will reexamine the Facebook Home before expanding its operating system to more phones in more countries.

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg has said he would’ve rebuilt Facebook as a mobile exclusive app if he had the chance, so clearly offering a solid mobile experience means a great deal to Facebook. In this regard, the Facebook phone was a brilliant idea and makes a great deal of sense — like Google and Android, a true Facebook phone would allow Zuckerberg & Co. to have complete control over the user experience and ad strategy. The HTC First was the company’s first attempt at such a device — Facebook would focus on software while HTC would focus on hardware — but with the phone failing so soon after its initial release, Facebook will need to take a long look in the mirror. 

Failure of the HTC First may be blamed on Facebook’s decision to make Facebook Home features too accessible to other mobile users on Android and iOS, or maybe Facebook will realize that the Facebook Home features were not that stellar to begin with.

Facebook has fumbled on mobile before, when it launched it’s first mobile site using the mobile browser channel – with poor user feedback on that approach, Facebook later changed course and focused on more cleaner mobile apps, but this was much later in it’s lifecycle; Facebook mobile has a history of bouncing back. The early years of Facebook mobile efforts were limited to working on a common mobile website version of it’s platform addressing multiple platforms like iOS and Android with one approach. It later realized that that approach did not augur well and got into building platform specific Facebook apps, which have been superb hits since.

The last note above take one back to mobile site vs mobile app debate, which continues to simmer in the mobile development world. So far, it seems, the Apps are winning with many firms (eg Financial Times) having switched from a common http://m.xyz-firm.com approach to custom mobile apps for each mobile platform. More on this later in this space.

(with extracts and ideas from International Business Times article dated May 24 by Dave Smith)

May 26th, 2013

Apple iPhone 5 is here : CellStrat opinion

As if you have not heard enough about iPhone 5 already, here is more of it :)

Apple announced iPhone 5 on Sept 12th. The other big thing that happened that day was Quantitative Easing version 3 announcement by US Federal Reserve – one wonders, it was a synchronized announcement – just kidding.. Certainly, some market analysts have said that iPhone 5 may do more for US GDP growth than Fed’s QE3..amazing..

Well, intentional or not, both the announcements have a dramatic impacts – QE3 will accelerate the stock market rise around the world, fuel more inflation etc. Apple announcement will lead to Apple maintaining it’s hegemony in the smartphone ecosystem. I know, I know, some of you are on side of the table which is less than enamoured by the new iPhone 5. However, our take is that the ecosystem of Apple is much too strong and still underestimated by most. The vertical integration of iTunes, Macs, iPhones, iPads, licensed content in there, seamless charging via iTunes, cross-device synch capabilities are so intense and so transformational in the tech world, that few can match up with Apple prowess over the marketplace. Apple ran out of online inventory of iPhone 5 in one hour of opening the sales..validation enough of a huge pent-up demand out there.

Lack of NFC or some other popular features, now commonplace in other smartphones, will not deter iPhone 5 in creating breakthrough success once again for Apple sales. What most people fail to realize about Apple is that it does not usually toe the line created by others – it creates new models which, in many cases, become the benchmark over time. Coming back to NFC, Apple did bundle a feature called Passbook in the new iPhone 5 – a loyalty and coupon management feature – this is not payment enabled but it could evolve into a Digital Wallet. Many leaders like eBay, Square, Paypal are making do without NFC in Mobile Payments and quite successfully at that. It is likely that NFC may never become the mainstream mobile payment tech if Apple and others listed here do not push it.

As to what Apple iPhone 5 does pack, it has a laundry list of neat features :

LTE (4G capable), Thinner, Lighter, bigger screen (4 inch diagonally), all new Apple-designed A6 chip, better retina display, improved camera (although megapixels remain at 8 megs), enhanced HD video recording, 5 rows of icons on the screen, improved Siri assistant, new lightning connector, new Apple mapping app, better iCloud integration, 700,000 apps, new iOS 6 OS, Passbook loyalty feature, the list goes on and on.

To view all iPhone 5 features, click here.

As far as we can visualize, we still feel demand for iPhone 5 will be back-logged and people will go gaga over this device the world over. Apple mobile leadership is far from being threatened, not until they make major blunders or others truly can provide a neat vertically integrated ecosystem. So far, we see only Amazon as being anywhere close to providing the vertical ecosystem with Kindle platform. Samsung tried but it is missing many major components for creating a complete ecosystem, music partnerships to begin with, among other things. Google does not try as their focus is entirely different – to monetize via search engines on Android devices.

So – for now, it is Apple’s world to rule in the mobile arena, until somebody else “does an Apple” on them.

September 17th, 2012

Mobile app advertising significantly drains battery power

It is true that those ads that show up on mobile applications will drain the juice out of a smartphone or other mobile device battery in a big way. Flashy ads that are full of animation and data will also use up a lot of a limited data plan. In addition, those “free” applications are not so free when they are supported by constant, animated and annoying ads.

The surprising news for many applications users is that the visible advertising is not the only thing that eats up the battery. Analytics, user tracking and smartphone data grabbing also goes on. Sometimes the other actions use up more battery power than the application itself.

The alternative should be to pay for the application in exchange for an ad free experience, but some developers are going for more income by selling applications and loading them up with ads, data grabbing or analytic operations, too. 

In one of the most infuriating cases, Rovio has stubbornly refused to charge a fee for an ad free version their insanely popular “Angry Birds” game application. Then Rovio developed a bad habit of placing ads in a way that interfered with playing the game. Worse, the game had differing game “physics” that required a player to try the same moves again and again in order to pass a single level. Each time, a new advertisement loaded up, driving the number of ad loads and other actions up to the stratosphere.

Smart users simply dumped the game from their mobile devices and opted to play it for free and without ads in other venues.

CMS Wire report on a study done at purdue University in Indiana titled, that 65 to 75% of the battery drain associated with certain applications can be caused by third party ads alone.

With Angry Birds as an example, the actual game took only 18% of the battery usage. The ads took a whopping 45% for the ad display, analytics and other ad related tasks. Free Chess, another analyzed game, used 50% of the apps energy drain to service the ads.

Of the power that ads use, the “3G Tail” is the main culprit. The 3G Tail involves,

Communication done between the app and the ad server in refreshing the ad and targeting the ad based on demographic and location, among other things.

Using eprof to monitor app power use on an HTC Passion running Android 2.3, the researchers made a few discoveries. In a study of the data aggregator Flurry consumes 45 percent of the app’s energy tracking the user’s location and serving ads to the app. But of that 45 percent, uploading the information and downloading the ads over 3G was only a 2KB transaction, taking 1 percent of the app’s energy.

(Source: http://arstechnica.com)

March 29th, 2012

Pick Pic Camera by Sony Digital Network App

Sony Digital Network Applications, Inc. (SDNA) released their pick pic camera, it is a Smartphone application that allows you to record photos right before and right after the moment you pressed the shutter button along with that very moment. You will then be able to pick the best shot among the pictures taken and save it as a still picture.

Key Features:

• Take pictures before and after the shutter clicks. It’s so simple; just tap the shutter to take a picture, If you wish to pick a photo other than the one you can see as thumbnail, then tap the thumbnail to move through images taken before and after the shutter clicked to find the best shot and pick the one that captured the best moment. It automatically records photos before and after moment you pressed the shutter button, enabling you to select and save the best picture.

• Various recording modes: such as “Children, pets, and group photos, etc.” that optimize the time interval between images to help ensure the best shot is captured.

• Call out feature: tap the call out icon on the camera screen, and Pick Pic camera calls out, “Say Cheese!” You can select alternate call out sounds, including an animal call or an explosion. Use call out to get the attention of a child or pet or to capture their look of surprise. You can also add your own audio files from the memory card as a call out sound.

The pick pic camera application is available on the Android platform.

(Source: Businesswire)

March 5th, 2012

The Indian Web and Mobile Markets by the numbers

(excerpted from GigaOm Pro article at http://t.co/20B9JVyo)

Katie Fehrenbacher with Gigaom is traveling with Geeks on a Plane in India. She writes following stats provided by Google CEO Rajan Anandan to the Geeks on a Plane group :

Rajan Anandan on Indian internet scene : “We’re probably in 1996 in the U.S. in terms of the Internet market in India.”

Here’s the stats from Anandan’s deck. India has:

  • 1.2 billion people
  • The 9th largest economy in the world, with $1.7 trillion GDP
  • 600 million people below the age of 25
  • 22 languages
  • 250 million in the consuming class — these are the folks that buy e-commerce
  • 900 million mobile accounts, with 600 million unique mobile subscribers (many people have more than one account)
  • 30 million PCs — it’ll be a mobile broadband world
  • Average revenue per user (ARPU) is $3
  • 100 million Internet users, and 120 million Internet users by the end of 2011
  • By 2015 there will be 300 million to 400 million Internet users
  • 37 percent of Internet users access the web from home, 27 percent from an Internet cafe, 22 percent from an office, 3 percent from school
  • There are 50 million mobile data subscribers
  • 5 million access Internet only on the phone
  • In 2010/2011 e-commerce emerged as a $7 billion market, with $6 billion of that going to online travel
  • By 2015 the e-commerce market is expected to be $40 billion
  • 67 percent of e-commerce customers by electronics and cell phones. 18 percent buy apparel.
  • 15 million 3G mobile subscribers
  • Broadband is 250 kbps to 500 kpbs fixed line
  • The use of smart phones will grow 52 percent CAGR
  • There are 37 million Facebook users
  • Google Plus use is bigger than Twitter use
  • 23 million unique users on YouTube India
  • There will be $1.3 trillion in online ad spend in 2011
  • The English Internet will not scale beyond 200 million, says Anandan
  • 159 million read Hindi newspapers and 31 million read English newspapers
  • There will be a massive tsunami toward vernacular content on the web, says Anandan
  • 70 percent of non-travel e-commerce is “cash on delivery” (no online payments, buyers pay cash when goods are delivered)
  • This cash on delivery market has a 30 percent return rate
  • Web 1.0 and 2.0 are happening at the same time in India, says Anandan.

Some Internet sites that have found success in India:

Thanks to Gigaom for the above post.

December 14th, 2011

Book Review : “India Inside : The Emerging Innovation Challenge to the West” by Nirmalya Kumar and Phanish Puranam

“India Inside : The Emerging Innovation Challenge to the West” is a new book authored by Nirmalya Kumar and Phanish Puranam, renowned professors at the elite London Business School. The book is published by Harvard Business Review Press and released in Nov 2011.

This book is about the “invisible” innovation which India today provides to a multitude of corporations and entities around the world. The book starts with questions like “Where are the Indian Googles, iPods and Viagras?” and “Can Indians innovate?”. Valid questions but which make slight of the fact that innovation is much more than consumer facing direct innovation. Indian ingenuity is enmeshed in so many products other multinationals make – likes of GE, Microsoft, IBM, AstraZeneca, Intel, Motorola and many others.

Globally Segmented Innovation :

As Western firms have outsourced large parts of the IT and research work to their Indian divisions and R&D labs, the skill profile of the Indian worker is increasing and firms are increasingly entrusting them with higher-end tasks. In this regard, the authors talk about the Skills Ladder concept – which says that when one creates an army of talent at the bottom of the product development pyramid, it is likely that innovation leaders emerge from this lot and remain in the geography where they are situated – as such, one can say that, thanks to Western outsourcing, a huge no of Indian engineers and innovators are being trained and are likely to boost the local innovation ecosystem via new entrepreneurial ventures or contributions to domestic economy.

In short, there is a talent shift to Asia from the Western hemisphere, which in turn will lead to accelerating growth and innovation in that part of the world.

Outsourced R&D :

For multinationals, Indian service providers like Wipro, Infosys, Tata and HCL are conducting outsourced R&D in labs all across India. Wipro pioneered the concept of outsourced R&D with it’s innovative Product Engineering Services division or PES starting way back in early 80s. Infosys products like Finacle and others like i-Flex have become global leaders in banking and finance. Outsourcing of R&D to India-based outfits creates talent pools in that part of the world and self-perpetuates further innovation and increased western investments.

Process Innovation – An Injection of Intelligence :

Indian call centers are often staffed with folks who are normally more qualified than a mundane call center job. This has caused the so called “injection of intelligence” into the mundane call center and BPO processes – processes which the Western world had written off as commoditized and boring. As a result, call center outsourcer 24/7 is injecting analytics-driven market intelligence into customer service calls and interactions – thereby increasing web / phone consumer loyalty and conversion rates. Higher qualified Indian talent is converting routine BPO processes into more strategic higher-value initiatives for western clients, thereby increasing ROI on outsourcing even more.

Management Innovation – The Global Delivery Model :

Infosys and other Indian IT firms have pioneered the global outsourcing and cost efficiencies which can be achieved in large projects. Saving costs and making the process faster, leaner and efficient is certainly innovation in it’s own right.

Visible Innovation – Frugal Engineering :

The emerging Asian middle class is known to demand and desire Western style products at cheaper cost. The Indian concept of “Jugaad” - or an ability to make do with less resources and still get things done, is now finding acceptance as a strategy in global Boardrooms. Tata Nano (and more recently Aakash tablet, I might add) are changing the debate of value vs cost. Developed markets are fascinated by Indian creations like Tata Nano and are studying such models closely to see how a quality mass market product can be developed at such a lower cost.

The authors also acknowledge the India’s innovation challenges eg slow bureaucracy, lack of infrastructure, lack of capital and population’s risk-averse nature. However, the Indian innovation train has started and few can turn the clock back now. As such, authors provide recommendations to both Indian and Western firms as to how to leverage or face the oncoming Indian innovation onslaught. We highly recommend this book to those who are interested in learning about the India’s growth and innovation story.

CellStrat Book Rating : **** (4 out of 5 stars)

December 1st, 2011

Toyota Touch Life

Toyota introduced Toyota Touch Life, a technology that allows drivers to fully integrate their smartphones into their Toyotas. The technology uses the latest industry connectivity protocols to mirror the smartphone’s display on the infotainment system’s touchscreen.

Drivers can access smartphone functionalities using steering wheel-based controls or the touchscreen surface. Toyota Touch Life will be available for the Toyota iQ city car towards the end of 2011 in selected markets.

 

November 23rd, 2011

Tablet owners more active m-commerce users

Last one year has seen a large number of e-commerce and deal site ventures getting funded in India and worldwide. Thus most of these companies are spending good amounts on online marketing etc. they are not leaving any stone unturned and thus adopting mobile and tablet friendly sites and apps too. My friend also bought an iPad2 recently and gifted to his wife to give her an entertainment mode beyond iPhone without imagining that his credit card expense will sky rocket as a result. Within in a week of gifting the tablet, he started seeing purchase alerts from his credit card company in denomination between 99cents to $5. He had to go back and ask her to stop playing so many paid games that she picked up new craze for, since she has got hold of the tab. My friend had never seen his wife purchasing through her iPhone before. No wonder m-commerce has increased and will increase further as all kinds of tablets will penetrate all stratas of society.

Increased tablet adoption could be the push that mobile commerce needs to get off the ground. Data from Ipsos indicates that tablet ownership leads to greater mobile purchasing, perhaps due to an improved shopping experience on the media-rich devices. According to Ipsos, tablet owners shop via mobile devices on a more frequent basis and spend more than smartphone owners.

Ipsos also presents a group of consumers called “dual owners”—those who own both tablet and smartphone devices. Dual owners, Ipsos determined, conduct m-commerce purchases twice as often as those who own only smartphones. Dual owners, on average, made more than 20 mobile purchases over the past year.

November 18th, 2011

A smartphone app on par with monitoring tools used in hospitals

Smartphone users can get a picture of their heart health using their phone’s camera and a new mobile application. A user holds his finger to the camera’s lens to measure blood flow, heart rhythm, respiration rate and blood-oxygen content. According to professor Ki Chon of Worcester Polytechnic Institute, who developed the tool, the app has the potential to be used on almost any phone with a video camera, and produces results on par with monitoring tools used in hospitals.

(Source: TG Daily)

October 10th, 2011

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